Newsletter

Derecho de la Competencia y Regulación de Mercados Digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas para Latinoamérica

14.07.2021
Ver Respuestas

"Desde nuestra perspectiva, el rezago de los mercados digitales en la región debe ser observado como una oportunidad por las autoridades, académicos y el resto de los agentes que se aproximan al derecho de la competencia desde el interés público en Latinoamérica. Es que en el devenir de los casos que han tenido lugar en regiones más desarrolladas y de las soluciones que se han propuesto frente a éstos, podemos ver el futuro de los casos que tendrán lugar, tarde o temprano, en las jurisdicciones de este rincón del mundo".

El documento de Andrés Fuchs N. y Nader Mufdi G. «Derecho de la Competencia y Regulación de Mercados digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas para Latinoamérica» (2021) aborda los desafíos que enfrentarán las autoridades de la competencia en Latinoamérica al lidiar con casos en mercados digitales, y genera propuestas para enfrentar de mejor forma este proceso de transición hacia la economía digital.

Revisa el video de presentación de este nuevo Diálogo CeCo:

Andrés Fuchs es abogado de la Universidad de Chile. Máster en Derecho de la Universidad de Harvard y Máster en razonamiento probatorio de la Universidad de Girona. Nader Mufdi es abogado de la Universidad de Chile, Máster en Derecho de la Universidad de Cambridge y Máster en Ciencias de la Regulación en LSE.

"The fast development of new online products and services imposes new challenges to competition law enforcement, with different responses being taken by several jurisdictions. With the digital economy a definite priority and more cases inevitably coming up, the question remains whether CADE will continue to follow its current more cautious position or will adopt a bolder stance regarding its abuse of dominance enforcement in the digital arena".

Unilateral conduct in digital markets: the Brazilian experience

The purpose of this short paper is to present an overview of the unilateral conduct cases involving digital markets so far decided by the Administrative Council for Economic Defense (CADE), the Brazilian competition agency, taking into account some of the questions posed by the article “Derecho de la Competencia y Regulación de Mercados Digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas para Latinoamérica”, by Andrés Fuchs Nissim and Nader Mufdi Guerra (henceforth the “Article”). The initial comments are followed by a brief review of all the cases in the digital space already decided by CADE up to now.

As in the rest of the world, Brazilian enforcers have been increasingly concerned about the behaviour of companies in the digital environment[1] and are questioning how best to provide the responses needed in this new environment. The Article proposes that there are currently two main approaches being explored worldwide as a reaction to the challenges posed by the Big Tech environment to competition policy, one of favouring ex ante regulation, like the European Union, and the other of rediscussing the tools and goals of antitrust policy, as in the United States. The Article also warns that Latin American authorities should be very cautious not to disincentivize innovation and should not simply copy-and-paste solutions from other jurisdictions[2].

Some of what CADE has done in Brazil fits well with the stance taken by the Article. CADE so far has not defended copying either of the approaches mentioned for the US and the EU. In fact, there has been no relevant discussion of ex ante regulation in Brazil and agency officials have spoken against the need for any revision of the instruments and goals of competition policy, claiming that the current toolbox is sufficient to deal with the digital world appropriately. And in practice, as will be seen in more detail in the review of the cases presented below, CADE´s decisional record so far indicates a careful and conservative approach, focusing on traditional consumer welfare analysis and on avoiding false positives, keeping away from interferences that could disincentivize innovation, as the Article defends. This has led to a more hands-off approach, with limited actual intervention, up to now. Two relevant settlements reached (out of the 10 cases in the area decided so far) also show a willingness to negotiate with the parties and reach a collaborative solution, another point the Article highlights as important in the proposed approach for Latin American authorities. In one of them, the Bradesco case (further reviewed in the list below), CADE showed a vigorous concern to protect new entrants and innovative services against barriers raised by incumbents.

But it is not certain that this careful course will be maintained, and whether these were just the initial more careful steps into a new field. At least one important decision not to act was taken by a very slim margin of 3×3 votes in the CADE Tribunal (with the president having to break the tie), with the defeated position defending that it should be sufficient to identify potential for antitrust damage for the agency to intervene, rather than only actual already occurring damage as the winning side advocated. Besides, the agency has shown to be deeply interested in further studying and exploring the subject and may question whether a more proactive approach could be warranted.

Indeed, studies focused on digital markets have been carried out both within the umbrella of the BRICS competition initiative[3] and by CADE´s own Department of Economic Studies (“DEE”) [4]. The first one highlighted the importance and sensitivity of the topic and its crucial importance for the BRICS economies especially at their stage of development. The second one by the DEE – a very respected division within the agency – provides a detailed survey of the jurisprudential developments worldwide and of the main debates surrounding antitrust enforcement in the digital space. It analysed multiple international papers and reports dealing with topic, aiming to “improve CADE`s policies and ensure the technical and scientific enhancement of the public enforcement in the fields”. CADE is therefore very aware of the state-of-the-art of the discussions taking place in other jurisdictions, including on whether more profound measures are necessary for agencies to adequately face these new challenges.

Also, and very importantly, a market inquiry proceeding (“Acompanhamento de Mercado”) has been launched by CADE and is currently under way dealing exactly with digital platforms and the Big Tech companies in Brazil. Such proceedings can be very wide in terms of scope and do not target a specific alleged violation. Though they cannot lead directly to remedies or enforcement actions, they can support the subsequent initiation of focused formal investigations. They can also be a key tool for the agency to map out the market and collect significant amounts of data since it allows for requests for information to be sent out to any market player.

Considering the concrete cases that CADE has decided so far (and which are reviewed individually below), the main findings of our research[5] explain and corroborate the view that the agency approach has been careful and restrained:

  • there are few cases decided in the digital market (only 10, while there are 10 ongoing);
  • all the investigations were initiated following complaints filed by third parties (competitors or other authorities), with no ex officio cases so far;
  • there is as yet no clear articulated specific standard to open and close investigations in the digital space;
  • Google has been the main target, with three out of the 10 decided cases, and is still currently under new scrutiny, while there are no public investigations against the other FAAG companies (Facebook, Amazon, and Apple);
  • the highly concentrated financial sector is a key area of concern, as shown in the Bradesco case dealing with foreclosure conduct towards new entrants (fintechs), as well as in the partnership with the Central Bank and in reiterated speeches by antitrust officials about the need to bolster competition and reduce barriers to entry in this industry;
  • CADE is very concerned about false positives and has been avoiding severe intervention, as stated in the decisions of the majority of the closed cases, and
  • there has been no conviction and only two settlements (in the Online Travel Agencies Parity Clauses and Bradesco cases), which were very relevant as they aimed at addressing points of concern in a collaborative manner with the parties; the Bradesco case was the only where the payment of a fine was required.

The fast development of new online products and services imposes new challenges to competition law enforcement, with different responses being taken by several jurisdictions. With the digital economy a definite priority and more cases inevitably coming up, the question remains whether CADE will continue to follow its current more cautious position or will adopt a bolder stance regarding its abuse of dominance enforcement in the digital arena.

Cases decided by CADE in digital markets (up to July 2021)

Google v Microsoft – sponsored online search (2019)

Based on a complaint filed by Microsoft in 2013, the Administrative Proceeding No 08700.005694/2013-19 was launched to investigate if Google AdWords’ terms and conditions imposed restrictions to the portability of advertising campaigns to rival platforms (multihoming), such as Bing.

In June 2019, following the recommendation of the General Superintendence (the investigative arm of the agency), CADE’s Tribunal unanimously dismissed the case. It concluded that the advertisers’ choice was based on the quality of the marketing campaigns performed by the platform and the number of its users, and Google could not be compelled to facilitate the multihoming among the different marketing platforms, since there were other ways of performing it, e.g., directly through AdWords or Bing Ads’ platforms.

Google v Buscapé – reviews scraping (2019)

After a complaint filed by E-Commerce Media Group in 2013, the Administrative Proceeding No 08700.009082/2013-03 was launched to investigate if Google leveraged its dominance in general search to benefit its comparison shopping service by scraping reviews from Buscapé, a price comparison website.

In June 2019, CADE’s Tribunal agreed with the General Superintendence and dismissed the case, considering that the use of a single review represented an isolated event, and resulted from a technical failure. Nevertheless, it requested the opening of a new investigation into Google’s conduct on the news market that is still ongoing.

Google v E-commerce – comparison shopping services (2019)

The Administrative Proceeding No 08012.010483/2011-94 was also launched after E-Commerce Media Group’s complaint that Google was unfairly favouring Google Shopping results to the detriment of other shopping comparison services.

In June 2019, in a split 3×3 decision that required the President’s casting a tie-breaker vote, the Tribunal followed the General Superintendence’s recommendation and dismissed the case. The majority understood that there was no evidence that competitors lost visibility in the results of the general search and that there was no causal link between the alleged conduct and the decrease in the number of comparison shopping websites. When dealing with dynamic and innovative markets, the mere potentiality of effects would not be enough to support a conviction. The slim margin in this case indicates that changes to this view, for instance, regarding the need to wait for concrete results before intervening, may take place even by way of the regular periodic changes to the composition of the Tribunal.

Uber[6] v Boa Vista Taxi Association – individual paid transport (2015)

In 2015, the Preparatory Proceeding of Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.004530/2015-36 was opened to assess the antitrust grounds of a complaint from Boa Vista Taxi Association (Associação Boa Vista de Táxi), forwarded by the Federal Prosecution Office. The association claimed that Uber was acting irregularly as a taxi service provider, violating national regulations on individual transport and consumer relations.

In November 2015, the General Superintendence dismissed the case due to the lack of elements for the characterisation of an antitrust violation and understood that the legislative branch or the regulatory authorities are empowered to address possible issues at stake. From CADE’s perspective, the entry of a new rival would tend to be procompetitive.

Uber v Consumer Protection Committee from the House of Representatives – individual paid transport (2017)

In 2015, the Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.010960/2015-97 was launched to assess the complaint that Uber would be using illicit means to dominate the market of individual paid transport. In October 2017, the General Superintendence dismissed the case using the rationale described in the previous case.

Uber v Apps Autonomous Drivers Association (AMAA) – individual paid transport (2018)

In 2016, the General Superintendence opened the Preparatory Proceeding of Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.008318/2016-29 aimed at assessing the antitrust grounds of a complaint from Associação de Motoristas Autônomos de Aplicativos (AMAA), forwarded by the Federal Prosecution Office. Uber was accused of predatory pricing, cartel and influencing uniform commercial behaviour. CADE highlighted the antitrust challenges in analysing this type of case, given the innovate nature of the services and that an imprecise decision could discourage the development of new innovative ventures and impair potential benefits to consumers.

In October 2018, the General Superintendence dismissed the case based on an effects analysis, referring to a report from its Department of Economic Studies (DEE), which analysed the effects of Uber entry into 590 Brazilian towns and cities between 2014 and 2016, concluding that users benefited from this business model, as taxi fares went down and individual transport demand increased.

Taxi drivers apps created by municipalities (2019)

In 2018, the Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.006067/2018-18 was opened after a complaint filed by the federal Secretariat for Competition Advocacy (SEPRAC) that the city governments of São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro and Manaus would artificially distort competition in the individual paid transport market by paying for the development of applications for taxi drivers. In July 2019, the General Superintendence dismissed the case on the grounds that the local authorities are empowered to regulate the taxi drivers’ activities, which would include the creation of technological tools to improve the service.

Mobile operators zero-rating offers (2017)

In 2016, after a complaint from the Federal Prosecution Office, the Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.004314/2016-71 was opened to investigate whether the zero-rating policies of the four major Brazilian mobile operators (Oi, Tim, Claro and Vivo) were hindering competition in the mobile applications sector. In 2017, after receiving information from several stakeholders (governmental agencies, companies etc), the General Superintendence dismissed the case, and concluded that the policies did not create barriers to entry, and consumers benefited from the increasing competition among the telecom operators.

Online travel agencies parity clauses (2017)

In 2016, the General Superintendence opened the Preliminary Inquiry No 08700.005679/2016-13 after a complaint of a Brazilian hotel chain operators’ association that accused travel aggregators Decolar, Booking and Expedia of imposing price parity clauses in agreements with hotel chains, which could result in price homogenisation and increase in barriers to entry. In 2018, the companies settled with the Tribunal under the same conditions, limiting the scope of the clauses (e.g., they could prohibit hotel chains from displaying best offers on their own websites, but could not forbid them to do it on competing OTAs platforms or offline sales).

Guiabolso v Bradesco – management of financial resources and loans

In April 2019, the General Superintendence launched the Administrative Proceeding No 08700.004201/2018-38 after a complaint filed by the Secretariat for Competition Advocacy (SEPRAC) in 2018 that Bradesco Bank was hindering Guiabolso’s business by adopting a new system of rotating random passwords to allow access to clients’ private information through internet banking. Guiabolso is an application that depends on access to information from the bank’s clients to offer management of financial resources and comparison of loan costs offered by different providers. In October 2020, Bradesco settled with CADE and agreed to cease the practices under investigation and to pay a reduced fine in the amount of BRL 23.8 million (then around US$ 4.1 million).

[1] As highlighted by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) in its Peer Reviews of Competition Law and Policy: Brazil 2019, “the digital economy has emerged as another priority sector given a number of high profile cases involving technology companies, disruptive innovators and online platforms”. Available at: https://www.oecd.org/competition/oecd-peer-reviews-of-competition-law-and-policy-brazil-2019.htm, page 38, accessed on July 10, 2021.

[2] The Article goes further and proposes a specific approach for Latin American agencies moving forward, but that raises a more complex discussion that will not be undertaken in this short paper.

[3] BRICS is the acronym for the group formed by Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa. The “BRICS in the Digital Economy: Competition Policy in Practice” report was drafted by member agencies and published in September 2019, with a view of competition policies and enforcement from BRICS countries in digital markets.

[4] In August 2020, DEE launched a study analyzing some issues involving the competition dynamics in the digital markets, confirming the attention given by the Brazilian watchdog on the matter. The work product was based on 21 reports and papers produced by other antitrust authorities and international research centers on the subject and does not necessarily reflect CADE’s view and positioning on the discussed issues. Available (in Portuguese) on http://www.cade.gov.br/noticias/estudo-do-dee-aborda-competicao-em-mercados-digitais, accessed on July 10, 2021.

[5] This article presents the results of the research on CADE’s public database. There may be other confidential investigations. The research was concluded in July 2021.

[6] In addition to the cases against Uber, it is worth mentioning the Administrative Proceeding No 08700.006964/2015-71, opened by CADE in 2015 following a complaint from Uber against representatives of taxi drivers associations for sham litigation and violent acts/threats against Uber drivers and passengers that impaired free competition. In July 2018, the Tribunal dismissed the case due to the lack of elements for the characterisation of antitrust violation.

Marcelo Calliari es Abogado de la Universidade de São Paulo. Doctor en Derecho de la Universidade de São Paulo y LLM de la Universidad de Harvard. Socio de TozziniFreire. Guilherme Ribas es Abogado, LLM y PhD de la Universidade de São Paulo. Socio de TozziniFreire

"Desde una perspectiva esencialmente práctica, resta evaluar si las distintas jurisdicciones de Latinoamérica están dispuestas a generar normas de estas características y si sus autoridades de competencia están preparadas para incorporar conceptos y herramientas sofisticadas de análisis en consonancia, no tan necesarias tal vez para mercados de “ladrillo y mortero”, pero fundamentales para mercados digitales".

La silicolonización del mundo[1] se consagra en la historia, constantemente evolutiva, de los sistemas computacionales. Como tal trae aparejado un sistema económico conocido como la economía de los datos o la economía digital, marcado por el desarrollo de un doble proceso que implica, por un lado, la generación exponencial de datos y, por otro, su diseminación en curso favorecida por todo tipo de sensores e inteligencias artificiales. Por su parte, el derecho consiste en detectar y atender la naturaleza jurídica del caso o bien descifrar una situación jurídica y hacer que coincida con su deber ser jurídico[2]. Sin embargo, para que el derecho logre comprender el suceso al que se enfrenta deberá antes conocer la estructura de los elementos que lo rodean, pues el derecho se compone a partir de la realidad que busca regular.

En consecuencia, textos como el comentado “Derecho de la Competencia y Regulación de Mercados Digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas para Latinoamérica” son pilares fundamentales para intentar enfrentar los desafíos que presentan las nuevas tecnologías al derecho de la competencia y sus autoridades.

Planteada la problemática, los autores Andrés Fuchs Nissim y Nader Mufdi Guerra se enrolan en la tarea de proponer soluciones híbridas para enfrentar la incertidumbre digital que domina en el campo de juego del derecho en general y de la práctica de antitrust en particular. Definen a las mismas como el “ejercicio de atribuciones de las autoridades del derecho de la competencia, combinando reglas sustantivas, criterios y principios propias del derecho antitrust con mecanismos tradicionalmente entendidos como regulatorios, a través de una misma instancia de intervención en el mercado”. Cabe destacar el uso del vocablo “combinando” y el contraste entre lo tradicional y lo adaptativo como uno de los temas principales en el texto que adelanta la propuesta de una interpretación armoniosa entre las regulaciones ex ante y ex post aludidas como las “caras de una misma moneda”.

Si bien es verdad que la naturaleza internacional de los mercados digitales invita a estudiar propuestas del derecho comparado, los autores advierten que importar modelos regulatorios es fructífero siempre y cuando su practicidad sea sometida a la traducción de nuestras costumbres y estructuras, evitando caer en el sintético “copy paste” de normas extranjeras. No por ello es menos cierto que existe la necesidad de construir normas jurídicas coherentes y uniformes bajo las cuales se sometan las empresas para evitar que el derecho se convierta en algo confuso y engorroso cuando éstas ejercen sus actividades económicas en distintas jurisdicciones. En consecuencia, el derecho comparado sirve como una fuente de inspiración orientativa en el proceso adaptativo de nuestra legislación sin necesidad de caer en una identidad absoluta.

Sumado a ello, considerando que los mercados digitales se replican en distintas partes del mundo, y cada vez con mayor rapidez, los autores dedican varias secciones a las soluciones implementadas en otras jurisdicciones. Entre ellas, la Unión Europea y Estados Unidos. Cuestionan en el camino la “rivalidad” entre la regulación ex ante y ex post como dos vías exclusorias una de otra. La primera, pensada por el continente europeo, busca regular anticipadamente futuros conflictos de un mercado como una suerte de derecho preventivo y anticipatorio. La segunda, adoptada por Estados Unidos, responde a un derecho que actúa con posterioridad a los acontecimientos. La primera se demuestra adaptativa y la segunda, si bien menos intervencionista, con mayor tendencia a cambiar sustancialmente el derecho de la competencia. Sin embargo, como bien se adelantó, los autores proponen en base a soluciones híbridas un abordaje integrativo de ambas propuestas.

Compete destacar que la naturaleza transnacional de este tipo de mercados no solo invita a evaluar las regulaciones adoptadas por otros países sino también adentrarnos en su casuística. En Argentina, por ejemplo, se está viendo cada vez más la influencia extranjera e importación de casos. Como ejemplo de lo anterior, la Comisión Nacional de Defensa de la Competencia (“CNDC”) de dicho país inició una investigación de oficio, en el mes de mayo, respecto las empresas Facebook y WhatsApp alegando como fundamento los antecedentes internacionales de investigaciones por abuso de posición dominante en otras jurisdicciones[3]. Dicha investigación surge a raíz de la entrada en vigor de las nuevas condiciones de servicio y política de privacidad de WhatsApp que no solo tendrían efecto en la Argentina sino también en otras partes del mundo entre las cuales cita a Turquía, India, Brasil, Alemania, Italia y Estados Unidos.

De la misma manera, en el mes de junio, la Comisión de la Unión Europea inició dos investigaciones. La primera, involucra a Google por una posible limitación a la competencia al restringir el acceso a terceros sobre datos para operar en el mercado del digital advertising[4]. La segunda, respecto a Facebook y su nuevo mercado “Facebook Marketplace” para evaluar la posibilidad de que la empresa tenga una ventaja competitiva en el mercado del digital advertising por la información que obtiene en sus redes[5] ¿Podría proyectarse una investigación similar en nuestra jurisdicción?

Lo citado demuestra que una investigación sobre posibles prácticas anticompetitivas en mercados digitales iniciada en una jurisdicción puede replicarse en otras produciendo un snowball effect. De esta manera, la presencia global de los mercados digitales no solo hace las veces de inspiración regulatoria sino también permite anticiparse a los casos que podrían plantearse ante las autoridades en Latinoamérica.

Finalmente, los autores no agotan su análisis sin antes proponer una vía para implementar sus propuestas a partir de Responsive Regulation. Dicha propuesta parece a todas luces acertada puesto que implica el acercamiento a las regulaciones internacionales mencionadas más arriba, pero adaptadas a la medida de las necesidades y dinámica de cada país. En sí, el Responsive Regulation está pensado como un sistema que invita a la construcción de normas amplias y adaptativas que respondan a diferentes tipos de intensidad de acuerdo con el caso analizado en cuestión. De esta manera, dependiendo de la menor o mayor diligencia de los potenciales infractores, corresponden sanciones de mayor o menor lesividad representadas en sus llamadas pirámides de sanciones. Como resultado, los autores logran un análisis completo y equilibrado de una problemática tangente e invitan a reflexionar sobre la solidez de nuestras arquitecturas normativas frente los sismos de la digitalización.

Desde una perspectiva esencialmente práctica, resta evaluar si las distintas jurisdicciones de Latinoamérica están dispuestas a generar normas de estas características y si sus autoridades de competencia están preparadas para incorporar conceptos y herramientas sofisticadas de análisis en consonancia, no tan necesarias tal vez para mercados de “ladrillo y mortero”, pero fundamentales para mercados digitales. A su vez, resulta muy importante que estas nuevas soluciones normativas-prácticas (como podría ser la adopción en parte de un sistema ex ante) no impliquen un intervencionismo tal que generen limitaciones a la innovación, que es en definitiva el motor de una economía latinoamericana que necesita con urgencia poder despegar.

[1] Sadin, Éric, “La silicolonización del mundo: La irresistible expansión del liberalismo digital”, Caja Negra, CABA, 2018.

[2] Mora Escobar, Alfonso Camilo, “La importancia de la teoría del derecho preventivo del consumo en la publicidad digital”, Revista Argentum – RA, e ISSN 2359-6889, Marília/SP, V. 21, N. 2, páginas 929-952.

[3] Disponible en https://www.argentina.gob.ar/sites/default/files/cautelar_whatsapp_facebook.pdf.

[4] Disponible en https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_3143.

[5] Disponible en https://ec.europa.eu/commission/presscorner/detail/en/ip_21_2848.

Miguel del Pino. Abogado de la Universidad de Buenos Aires y Master of Laws de la University of Pennsylvania. Socio en Marval O'Farrell Mairal

"Otra barrera de importancia se origina de la falta de conocimiento del funcionamiento e interacciones de los mercados digitales por parte de las autoridades de competencia y la falta de recursos e infraestructura de las entidades de competencia que limita la posibilidad de contar con personal especializado y experimentado en estos mercados. Esto no constituye una crítica, sino la constatación de que es difícil actuar sobre algo de lo que no se entiende en su totalidad".

He aceptado con mucho gusto la honrosa invitación del Centro de Competencia de la Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez y de su Director, Prof. Felipe Irarrázabal, para comentar el artículo escrito por los señores abogados Andrés Fuchs y Nader Mufdi, denominado “Derecho De La Competencia y Regulación De Mercados Digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas Para Latinoamérica”, no sólo por el honor que representa comentar un trabajo tan bien realizado por profesionales tan destacados, sino porque la temática y conclusiones planteadas en el artículo, son novedosas y de gran utilidad para el ámbito académico y profesional latinoamericano, y, de Ecuador en particular, pues identifica con mucha claridad las principales dificultades y retos que afrontan el Derecho de Competencia y las autoridades de competencia en la región con respecto al control y regulación de los mercados digitales, en circunstancias en las que se ha acelerado el proceso de tránsito a economías que ponen en su eje a los servicios digitales, tal como lo advierten los autores.

En este corto documento me permitiré desarrollar algunas reflexiones y conclusiones recogidas en el artículo en cuestión.

Antes que nada, resalto nuevamente que el tema tratado en el artículo es muy novedoso para la esfera latinoamericana, pues en la región no se ha analizado suficientemente -ni cuantitativa ni cualitativamente- a los mercados digitales y economía digital, y su relación con el Derecho de Competencia, ni académicamente ni por parte de las autoridades de competencia. Esto contrasta con las discusiones y situación en otras jurisdicciones, especialmente en los Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, en donde con frecuencia se publican nuevos artículos académicos sobre el tema y no es raro ver en los titulares de prensa noticias sobre algún pronunciamiento de una autoridad o el inicio de una investigación o caso relacionado con los mercados digitales.

Esta escasa discusión y análisis en los ámbitos indicados, en parte, puede explicarse por la poca profundidad y actividad en casos relacionados con este tema por parte de las autoridades de competencia de Latinoamérica, pero también en otros factores que están presentes en varias jurisdicciones de la región, algunos también mencionados en el artículo.  Por ejemplo, han existido varios casos en la región relacionados con la irrupción del servicio de transporte por medio de aplicaciones (ride-hailing apps) y su relación con el servicio de taxis, pero aparte de analizar una potencial competencia desleal a estos últimos y alguna referencia sobre la innovación, no se ha entrado a analizar a fondo la estructura de competencia en estos nuevos mercados. Esto es más palpable en el caso de Ecuador, en donde aparte de un estudio y recomendación sobre el servicio de transporte a través de aplicaciones y su potencial afectación a los taxistas, no se han conocido otras iniciativas ni casos de investigación.

También puede explicarse, por el rezago de Latinoamérica, en relación con jurisdicciones como Estados Unidos y la Unión Europea, en la adopción de nuevas tecnologías y en particular el uso del internet como herramienta o fuente de generación de negocios, ya sea por la poca conectividad de la población a internet con suficiente ancho de banda o por la poca inversión de las empresas en el mundo digital.  Sin embargo, hay que reconocer que por la Pandemia se ha dado un enorme salto en los países latinoamericanos y en el mundo en general en la adopción del internet y la tecnología en todas las áreas, así como el desarrollo de mercados digitales.  A manera de ejemplo, vale mencionar que en todos o en la mayoría de los países latinoamericanos se ha vuelto común el uso de firmas electrónicas, la realización de videoconferencias y las compras por internet.  En el año 2020, en Ecuador hubo un crecimiento del 43.75% del comercio electrónico (un incremento de 800% de visitas a páginas web y un incremento de 44% de órdenes de compra)[1]. Este salto gigante en la adopción y el uso del internet como medio de hacer negocios debería transformarse en una mayor actividad del derecho de competencia y sus autoridades de control en investigar y analizar el nivel competitivo de los mercados digitales.

Coincido con los autores en que este rezago constituye una oportunidad para las autoridades de competencia de Latinoamérica, las que tienen la posibilidad de adoptar e implementar soluciones efectivas, aprovechando la experiencia que han acumulado otras jurisdicciones más desarrolladas.

Otra barrera de importancia se origina de la falta de conocimiento del funcionamiento e interacciones de los mercados digitales por parte de las autoridades de competencia y la falta de recursos e infraestructura de las entidades de competencia que limita la posibilidad de contar con personal especializado y experimentado en estos mercados. Esto no constituye una crítica, sino la constatación de que es difícil actuar sobre algo de lo que no se entiende en su totalidad. Los autores aciertan en mencionar que, sin duda es mucho más fácil entender el funcionamiento de un establecimiento de “ladrillo y mortero”, que el funcionamiento de plataformas digitales con uso extensivo de algoritmos y programas computacionales. La complejidad del funcionamiento de los mercados digitales constituye una barrera importante para que una autoridad de competencia pueda comprender y luego actuar. Este problema no sólo se encuentra a nivel regional, sino que es de alcance global, sin embargo, en diversos países y regiones ya ha habido iniciativas para entender mejor el funcionamiento de los mercados digitales y su relación con el derecho de competencia. Ejemplos de esto lo podemos encontrar en el informe del Congreso de los Estados Unidos sobre la competencia en mercados digitales[2] o en las diversas estrategias e iniciativas legales de la Comisión Europea[3]. Este tipo de iniciativas son justamente las que deberían realizar las diversas autoridades de competencia latinoamericanas, es decir, realizar extensos estudios para entender los mercados digitales y formar equipos con pleno conocimiento de los mismos. Un rol inicial sería desarrollar estas habilidades en base a actividades de abogacía de la competencia, con estudios de carácter general, para que el conocimiento y competencias adquiridas sean en un futuro aplicadas para casos de investigación o de control de concentraciones económicas.

Otra importante barrera a tomar en consideración nace de la naturaleza misma de los mercados digitales, del hecho de que en la mayoría de los casos no es necesario tener un establecimiento permanente en el país en el que se presta el servicio. El hecho que las empresas participen en el mercado de un país, pero que no tengan presencia en el mismo, genera una serie de complicaciones para una autoridad de competencia que quiera investigar dicho mercado. Por ejemplo, no se sabría a dónde dirigir requerimientos de información o a qué personas contactar para convocar a una reunión de trabajo, o incluso una notificación formal del inicio de una investigación genera dificultades prácticas y legales a una autoridad.  De esta manera, si a una autoridad de competencia le era fácil iniciar una investigación el mercado de televisión abierta o por suscripción, en donde los partícipes usualmente tenían presencia dentro del país, puede ser mucho más difícil en el mercado de televisión vía internet (streaming o servicios over the top) en donde los partícipes no suelen estar domiciliados en el país. Esta nueva realidad, forzará a las autoridades a idear nuevos mecanismos para identificar y contactar a estas empresas; ya sea flexibilizando la forma en la que se notifican distintos requerimientos o suscribiendo convenios de cooperación con otras autoridades de competencia.

La expansión de los mercados digitales y el nacimiento de gigantes en el sector que a su vez se han convertido en las empresas más grandes del mundo, ha tocado los cimientos mismos del derecho de competencia actual y ha llevado replantearse el rol que el derecho de competencia y sus autoridades de control deben tener en el desarrollo de los mercados. Es decir, no sólo está en discusión cómo aplicar el derecho de competencia a los mercados digitales, sino si debe o no reformarse el derecho de competencia actual, para afrontar las preocupaciones a la competencia en los mercados digitales. Esta última discusión es algo en lo que están aún más lejanas las autoridades de competencia latinoamericanas. Los autores abordan esta temática muy bien, y realizan reflexiones muy interesantes.

El discutir acerca de la reforma del derecho de competencia o un cambio significativo en su forma de aplicarlo es algo complicado de realizar si tomamos en cuenta que la mayoría de las legislaciones de la región están inspiradas o incluso constituyen un “corta y pega” de las legislaciones de otras regiones y países, especialmente de la Unión Europea y países europeos. De igual manera, los distintos criterios, argumentos y análisis se encuentran inspirados en decisiones o jurisprudencia de países en los que el derecho de competencia se encuentra más desarrollado, como por ejemplo Estados Unidos o la Unión Europea.

La ausencia de una teoría o postura original y propia sobre la regulación y control de la competencia en los mercados, sin duda representa una limitación a la hora de discutir si el derecho de competencia debe cambiar sustancialmente. En ese sentido, me temo que como región se esperará a que el polvo se asiente en los principales centros del derecho de competencia, Estados Unidos y Europa, para saber si se aplicará algún cambio en la legislación de la materia y la actuación de las autoridades de competencia y cómo se lo hará. En este punto, será interesante observar si el objetivo del derecho de competencia a nivel global cambia desde la visión generalmente aceptada de que el objetivo último es el bienestar del consumidor y que la presencia de pocos competidores no es un problema siempre y cuando se cumpla con este objetivo; a una visión en la que prime el garantizar una estructura del mercado en la que haya muchos competidores y evitar la presencia de gigantes que dominen un mercado en particular[4].

En el artículo los autores realizan un importante análisis y propuestas, que se deben considerar, para procurar el correcto funcionamiento de los mercados digitales de Latinoamérica.

[1] En 2021, el comercio electrónico mantendrá un crecimiento sostenido en Ecuador | Ekosnegocios

[2] Página 30 del artículo.

[3] Página 18 del artículo.

[4] Para una discusión interesante sobre el tema recomiendo leer el artículo “Twilight of the Lodestars: Brandeis, Chicago, Schumpter and the Future of Competition Policy” de Joseph V. Coniglio en Twilight of the Lodestars: Brandeis, Chicago, Schumpeter and the Future of Competition Policy (competitionpolicyinternational.com)

María Rosa Fabara Vera es Abogada de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador. Doctora en jurisprudencia de la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Ecuador. Socia Fundadora de Fabara Abogados.

"Sólo queda seguir invirtiendo en capacidades técnicas para poder generar estudios, hipótesis sobre potenciales teorías de daño y remedios para modelos y tipos de mercados digitales. Igualmente, desarrollar capacidades tecnológicas que permitan anticipar su evolución y adoptar nuevas estrategias para las funciones de investigación y monitoreo. Esto, más las labores tradicionales de abogacía, permitirán a las empresas tener una mayor visibilidad de los criterios y potencial posición de la autoridad lo que facilitará la adoptación de medidas preventivas tendientes al cumplimiento".

Comentario: La solución híbrida a la luz de la realidad mexicana

La discusión sobre los retos que enfrentan las autoridades de competencia en el mundo ante un entorno digital que evoluciona de manera acelerada ha dominado la agenda internacional. Diversas autoridades y estudiosos han dedicado mucha tinta en identificar las características que lo hace proclive a generar situaciones que limitan el funcionamiento eficiente de los mercados.[1]

No obstante, el documento preparado por A. Fuchs y N. Mufdi presenta una perspectiva diferente y, por demás, útil al partir de la realidad Latinoamericana. En particular, los autores identifican soluciones institucionales a las que denomina híbridas, mismas que, dependiendo la arquitectura legal de cada jurisdicción, pudieran ser adoptadas para poder generar respuestas “eficaces, eficientes y oportunas” a las fallas de los mercados digitales.[2]

El contexto mexicano comparte las características señaladas por los autores, entre ellas, que (i) enfrenta importantes retos en el acceso, uso y calidad de las redes por parte de la población;[3] y (ii) si bien, empresas mexicanas han sido exitosas en implementar nuevas soluciones a través de plataformas digitales o financieras,[4] seguimos siendo “importadores” de soluciones.

De esta forma, la promoción de inversión y competencia para el desarrollo eficiente de la infraestructura de telecomunicaciones para ampliar cobertura y la “alfabetización digital” sigue siendo prioritario para nuestro país. Igualmente coincido con los autores respecto a la necesidad de mantener un ambiente flexible de transición.

Ahora bien, para efectos de analizar las propuestas de solución para el caso mexicano y los retos que considero que enfrentamos en nuestro país, retomaré aspectos relevantes de nuestra arquitectura legal-institucional, misma que, de hecho, ya contemplan soluciones tanto de diagnóstico, como correctivas, como lo es la llamada “solución híbrida”, nombrada así por la propia presidenta de la COFECE.[5]

Ventajas del diseño institucional

A partir de la Reforma Constitucional del 2013, la política de competencia se fortaleció, creando a dos órganos constitucionales autónomos (i.e. COFECE y el Instituto Federal de Telecomunicaciones, IFT, tratándose de los sectores de telecomunicaciones y radiodifusión). Dichos órganos fueron dotados de facultades incrementales para cumplir con su mandato consistente en vigilar que los mercados se desarrollen en condiciones de competencia, promoviendo así el funcionamiento eficiente de los mercados.[6]

La posterior Ley Federal de Competencia Económica (LFCE) de competencia facultó a esas autoridades a la realización de estudios en materia de competencia económica y, con base en ellos, a la posibilidad de realizar propuestas de liberalización, desregulación o modificación normativa, en caso de detectar riesgos o problemas en el proceso de competencia. Ésta constituye una buena herramienta que puede utilizarse para el conocimiento y diagnóstico de los mercados digitales en materia de competencia. Y desde el punto institucional, da la oportunidad a la autoridad respectiva a identificar las áreas y temas técnicos y operativos de estos mercados que necesita conocer y profundizar.

Dentro de las facultades incrementales de estos órganos, inspiradas precisamente en el modelo del Reino Unido que ahora también inspiran a la New Tool de la propuesta Europea, se determinó que la autoridad de competencia contará, además de las facultades tradicionales de otras autoridades de competencia, con “las facultades necesarias para cumplir eficazmente con su objeto, entre ellas las de ordenar medidas para eliminar barreras a la competencia y libre concurrencia regular el acceso a insumos esenciales y ordenar la desincorporación de activos”.

De esta forma, el artículo 94 de la LFCE da cabida a este mecanismo “híbrido” que permite una intervención de la autoridad de competencia para “corregir”, a través de una intervención regulatoria, un mercado que no funciona adecuadamente.

El procedimiento respectivo se sustancia bajo el análisis tradicional de competencia, pero sus órdenes o medidas correctivas a agentes económicos pueden llegar a ser tan diversos como problemática se compruebe que exista. En efecto, como resultado de este procedimiento COFECE, tiene facultades para i) emitir recomendaciones a las autoridades públicas; ii) ordenar a agentes económicos eliminar una barrera a la competencia; iii) determinar la existencia de insumos esenciales y regular las modalidades de acceso, precios, condiciones técnicas y calidad; o iv) ordenar la desincorporación de activos o acciones del agente económico involucrado, para eliminar los efectos anticompetitivos. [7]  Es importante notar que la Ley establece un estándar alto para la imposición de medidas por la autoridad quien tendrá que verificar que éstas “generarán incrementos en eficiencia en los mercados

En su momento, esta facultad fue cuestionada y criticada por diversos autores en la medida en que modificaba la naturaleza de una autoridad de competencia hacia una autoridad regulador.[8] En retrospectiva e incluso con las limitaciones que ha enfrentado, esta inclusión se adelantó a los tiempos, posicionándose como una herramienta relevante para reaccionar a potenciales situaciones que comprometan las condiciones de competencia en los mercados digitales.

A pesar de ser procedimientos legales sujetos a impugnación, es importante señalar que, por disposición constitucional, las órdenes de COFECE o IFT no son susceptibles de ser suspendidas por los Tribunales −salvo que COFECE ordene una desincorporación− y sólo en caso de éxito en la impugnación, dejarán de aplicarse. No obstante, por el hecho de ser un procedimiento legal complejo compuesto de diferentes etapas, la adopción de medidas correctivas puede tardar más de un año.

Por otro lado, es Interesante reflexionar en dos temas centrales que subrayan los autores (i) la flexibilidad; y (ii) el incentivo de cooperación entre autoridades y agentes económicos.

Por su naturaleza de órganos autónomos, COFECE e IFT tienen facultades para emitir su propia regulación para cumplir su mandato. Bajo el modelo de Estado regulador, esta posibilidad les otorga una importante flexibilidad para generar espacios de colaboración e incentivar la cooperación de los agentes económicos. La propia Ley ya abre actualmente el espacio para que los agentes económicos propongan medidas alternativas y abrir un diálogo regulatorio en el contexto de un procedimiento que tiene una naturaleza de corrección.

Por otra parte, en México también tenemos experiencia en la aplicación de regulación asimétrica. En el caso de telecomunicaciones a los agentes preponderantes, por ejemplo, después de una declaratoria sobre la inexistencia de condiciones de competencia efectiva o poder sustancial, se habilita el establecimiento de regulación específica ya sea tarifaria o de comportamiento.[9]

Para el caso de la aplicación de esta regulación, la Constitución estableció un umbral de más del 50% de participación de mercado sectorial.[10] En el caso de los mercados digitales, me parece que un umbral medido en participación será riesgoso de definir. Es por ello que, a estas alturas, la labor de abogacía para que las empresas se autorregulen podría ser una mejor solución.

Desventaja del modelo

Quizás, la principal desventaja que veo del diseño institucional viene de la fragmentación entre las tareas de competencia de COFECE e IFT. En efecto, a al día de hoy se han ventilado diversos conflictos competenciales[11] y las materias o áreas de competencia de cada uno de ellos se dibujan con mayor claridad.[12]

Por ejemplo, recientemente el Primer Tribunal Colegiado Especializado en la materia, en torno a la investigación iniciada por el IFT por la posible existencia de barreras a la competencia e insumos esenciales en los mercados de los servicios de búsqueda en línea, redes sociales, servicios en la nube y sistemas operativos móviles, determinó que los primeros tres mercados son competencia de COFECE, siendo el último del IFT. Dicha decisión coloca a COFECE en un papel clave tanto en el análisis de dichos mercados como en la aplicación del procedimiento del artículo 94 por primera vez respecto de los mercados digitales, y con ello, vislumbrar su eficacia. Sin embargo, existe un riesgo de que esa fragmentación entre autoridades no facilite una coordinación que maximice la alta especialización del IFT en el sector de telecomunicaciones, el insumo clave en la operación de los mercados digitales.

En todo caso, siguen existiendo áreas grises o en las que existe riesgo de políticas contradictorias (por ejemplo, en mercados de publicidad de plataformas de telecomunicaciones vs otras plataformas). Más allá de esto, la coordinación entre ambas autoridades para enfrentar y desarrollar capacidades institucionales es deseable. Más aún, la cooperación entre autoridades de diferentes jurisdicciones sería ideal, considerado la presencia de los principales jugadores en estos mercados.

Conclusión

En el caso de México, considero que las autoridades de competencia cuentan con facultades legales para enfrentar, como lo dicen los autores, los actuales retos mientras “pasa el temblor”. Particularmente, el procedimiento correctivo del artículo 94 de la LFCE tiene el potencial de permitir una intervención regulatoria flexible y adoptada al caso concreto, que van desde medidas conductuales, estructurales y recomendaciones regulatorias. Sólo queda seguir invirtiendo en capacidades técnicas para poder generar estudios, hipótesis sobre potenciales teorías de daño y remedios para modelos y tipos de mercados digitales. Igualmente, desarrollar capacidades tecnológicas que permitan anticipar su evolución y adoptar nuevas estrategias para las funciones de investigación y monitoreo. Esto, más las labores tradicionales de abogacía, permitirán a las empresas tener una mayor visibilidad de los criterios y potencial posición de la autoridad, lo que facilitará la adoptación de medidas preventivas tendientes al cumplimiento.

Un punto importante será estudiar la forma de agilizar procedimientos sin menoscabar derechos, a fin de que los remedios en los mercados se puedan implementar de manera más expedita, atendiendo a la naturaleza altamente dinámica de dichos mercados.

[1] En el caso particular de México, las dos autoridades de competencia en México han emitido documentos en los que tratan estos temas. En el caso de la Comisión Federal de Competencia Económica (COFECE), el pasado 30 de marzo de 2020 emitió un documento denominado Estrategia Digital, en el que identifica las “preocupaciones” que levantan los mercados digitales, entre las que apunta: el efecto de “el ganador se lleva todo”, los “precios cero”, potencial colusión de algoritmos, adquisición de competidores potenciales, conductas que fortalecen el poder sustancial, sesgo de los competidores y explotación de datos (disponible en https://www.cofece.mx/estrategia-digital-cofece/).

[2] Véase página 41 del Documento.

[3] De acuerdo con la última Encuesta Nacional sobre Disponibilidad y Uso de Tecnologías de la Información en los Hogares (ENDUTIH) 2020 https://www.inegi.org.mx/contenidos/saladeprensa/boletines/2021/OtrTemEcon/ENDUTIH_2020.pdf

[4] Véase https://www.finnovista.com/radar/mexico-supera-la-barrera-de-las-300-startups-fintech/

[5] Véase Palacios, Alejandra, Are market investigations a suitable tool for the analysis of digital markets, en Concurrences, No.1-2021- Disponible en: https://www.cofece.mx/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/01-Concurrences_1-2021_Foreword_Palacios-Prieto-1.pdf

[6]  Artículo 28 de la Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos (Constitución).

[7] Vid. Ídem.

[8] Véase, por ejemplo, postura de la International Chamber of Commerce, disponible en https://www.iccmex.mx/uploads/postu/PosturasobrelaLeyFederaldeCompetencia.pdf

[9]  Procedimiento contemplado en el artículo 96 de la LFCE, así como el artículo 265 de la Ley Federal de Telecomunicaciones y Radiodifusión, para dichos sectores.

[10] Artículo transitorio Octavo, fracción III, párrafo segundo del “DECRETO por el que se reforman y adicionan diversas disposiciones de los artículos 6o., 7o., 27, 28, 73, 78, 94 y 105 de la Constitución Política de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos, en materia de telecomunicaciones”, publicado el 11 de junio de 2013 en el Diario Oficial de la Federación.

[11] Como lo fueron las concentraciones entre Nokia-Alcatel (expediente CCA 2/2015 del Segundo Tribunal Especializado en la materia), AT&T-Time Warner (expediente CCA 1/2017 del Segundo Tribunal Especializado), Uber-Cornershop (expediente CCA 4/2019 del Primer Tribunal Especializado) y la investigación por barreras a la competencia e insumos esenciales (expediente CCA 1/2021 del Primer Tribunal Especializado).

Abogada. Licenciada en Derecho por el Instituto Tecnológico Autónomo de México. Socia en SAI Derecho y Economía (México), experta en derecho de competencia y mercados regulados.

"Si en algo “dista” la realidad política, económica y cultural de Latinoamérica “de los países desarrollados” es precisamente en su precario nivel de desarrollo institucional y capacidad de gestión estatal, medida en innumerables índices comparativos. Partiendo de esa realidad fáctica, la propuesta comentada, que implica concentrar facultades y, por ende, poder (ius imperium y ius punendi) en manos de estructuras institucionales débiles, me siembra profundas dudas. El riesgo de que la autoridad de competencia se contagie de las falencias típicas de la burocracia regulatoria amerita prudencia y mucha reflexión sobre este tema".

Los autores nos plantean la importancia de la economía digital, basada en las tecnologías de la información y las comunicaciones, como un medio para promover la eficiencia económica, cerrar las brechas de productividad con los países más desarrollados y mejorar los servicios sociales. Todos estos, objetivos muy loables, sin duda. Sin embargo, más que proponer mecanismos para coadyuvar o acelerar los procesos de digitalización de la economía, se asume que este proceso de transformación de las estructuras económicas, incipiente aún en la región (y de algún modo ya en marcha por la pandemia sanitaria), será una “realidad que, inexorablemente, nos tocará afrontar”. Este pronóstico asume que, de la mano de esta mayor eficiencia y ganancia de productividad, los mercados latinoamericanos enfrentarán nuevos retos, que desde ya se vislumbrarían revisando la casuística que hoy ocupa a las autoridades en Europa y en los Estados Unidos. Ante ello, los autores indicen en la necesidad de prepararnos, de manera prospectiva, institucionalmente.

La propuesta central del ensayo consiste en implementar un modelo institucional híbrido y autóctono que, dejando de lado “el trasplante o aplicación de soluciones comparadas” importadas, parta de reconocer que la realidad política, económica y cultural de Latinoamérica dista de las de los países desarrollados. Esta propuesta, de manera simplificada, se podría resumir en dotar de capacidad regulatoria a las autoridades de competencia.

Si bien modelos institucionales híbridos como el propuesto no son estándares en el mundo comparado, la propuesta en sí no es novel. Modelos de agencias híbridas no sólo se han postulado en el pasado, sino sin ir muy lejos, se han implementado en la región. Un ejemplo palpable es caso de las telecomunicaciones en el Perú, sector en el cual el organismo de supervisión de esta actividad (OSIPTEL) se encuentra facultado para emitir regulaciones de manera ex ante y además para aplicar de manera exclusiva la legislación general de protección de la libre competencia a los agentes que concurren en este mercado. Volveremos sobre este ejemplo más adelante.

Al igual que los autores, no soy amigo de los postulados que nos presentan el derecho de la competencia y la regulación ex ante como herramientas contrapuestas, rivales, alternativas o exclusorias, provengan estos ya sea de las tribunas ideológicas más liberales o de las más intervencionistas. Creo más bien que se trata de herramientas complementarias, cada una con objetivos, alcances y limitaciones, cuyo correcto funcionamiento nos exige -a diferencia de la tesis presentada- mantener su separación y más bien concentrarnos en reforzar la capacidad de gestión institucional de las diversas autoridades.

El derecho de la competencia tiene un objetivo macro o general, trasversal a toda actividad económica, mientras que la regulación estatal suele perseguir objetivos micros o específicos, incluso ad hoc, que en ocasiones se alienan con el primero, pero muchas veces cautelan intereses públicos totalmente disímiles. Lo que se observa en agencias hibridas como el Osiptel peruano muchas veces es una confusión de objetivos y el apalancamiento y empleo de las herramientas punitivas excepcionales del derecho de la competencia para promover fines sectoriales.

Todas las actividadedes económicas, sin distinción, deben someterse a estrictas exigencias del derecho a la competencia, pero el grado, extensión e intensidad de la regulación ex ante variará para cada actividad en función a consideraciones de diversa índole. El que estemos discutiendo modelos híbridos para la economía digital y no para otros o para todos los sectores económicos, transparenta que este sector en particular puede generar en algunos mayor desconfianza y propensión para la intervención y despliegue de las herramientas del derecho antitrust. Un déjà vu a la era de los grandes barones industriales norteamericanos. No pretendo en este comentario escueto abogar en contra de regular ciertas actividades económicas con mayor intensidad, ni propongo un modelo laissez faire para los titanes de la economía digital. Soy consciente que la concentración de poder económico conlleva a la maldición de la grandeza, parafraseando a Louis Brandeis, y al mayor despliegue de herramientas regulatorias y mayor escrutinio del derecho de la competencia. Simplemente, me cuesta visualizar la causalidad entre las estructuras económicas de la economía digital y el modelo de agencia híbrida o cómo esta última es mas efectiva para supervisar la primera.

Las herramientas del derecho de la competencia y de la regulación ex post igualmente tienen sus propias limitaciones. El monolítico y vehemente objetivo del derecho de la competencia, las limitaciones temporales propias del enforcement ex post y dudosa efectividad de los mecanismos de control estructural ex ante, son usualmente invocados por quienes claman mayor regulación e intervención estatal en las actividades económicas. Los costos, asimetría informativa y externalidades negativas imprevisibles, aunado a los riesgos de captura del regulador y los riesgos derivados del paradigma de la burocracia interesada sobre el que se modela la teoría de la elección colectiva convencional, pueblan las banderas de quienes abogan por la desregulación y menor intervención. Cómo puede el modelo hibrido propuesto mitigar, o por el contrario acentuar las falencias de uno y otro modelo requiere aclararse.

Lo último me conduce a una reflexión en torno al carácter “autóctono” de la propuesta, que pretende reconocer que la realidad política, económica y cultural de Latinoamérica dista de las de los países desarrollados. Si en algo “dista” la realidad política, económica y cultural de Latinoamérica “de los países desarrollados” es precisamente en su precario nivel de desarrollo institucional y capacidad de gestión estatal, medida en innumerables índices comparativos. Partiendo de esa realidad fáctica, la propuesta comentada, que implica concentrar facultades y, por ende, poder (ius imperium y ius punendi) en manos de estructuras institucionales débiles, me siembra profundas dudas. El riesgo de que la autoridad de competencia se contagie de las falencias típicas de la burocracia regulatoria amerita prudencia y mucha reflexión sobre este tema.

El derecho de la competencia no es regulación. Es, a falta de una expresión igualmente efectiva en castellano, law enforcement. De ahí que la separación entre la función policial o de enforcement de la función legislativa o regulatoria, se torne imprescindible en un Estado de Derecho.

La separación de funciones es una expresión de la separación de poderes, donde la interacción de una autoridad antitrust y una autoridad regulatoria sirve muchas veces de contrapeso. Particularmente, y aunque para algunos pueda parecer poco efectivo, el rol de abogacía de la competencia que ejerce una autoridad antitrust es fundamental para promover mercados competitivos de manera trasversal en distintos sectores regulados, orientando la actividad de los reguladores y uniformizando objetivos en pro del correcto funcionamiento de la economía y el bienestar de los consumidores.

Carlos A. Patron es Bachiller en Derecho y Abogado por la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú. Magister en Políticas Públicas en Latinoamérica por la Universidad de Oxford; Master en Derecho por la Universidad de Yale. Socio en Payet, Rey, Cauvi, Pérez Abogados y profesor en la Pontificia Universidad Católica del Perú.

"Y es que -en palabras de los autores- el rezago de la región en el desarrollo de los mercados digitales ofrece una oportunidad única para implementar soluciones adecuadas aprovechando la experiencia de jurisdicciones en las que estos temas se han desarrollado intensamente. Ello, por supuesto, no implica adoptar un rol completamente pasivo, ni mucho menos actuar como simples espectadores del acontecer internacional. Por el contrario, exige ir preparándose para un fenómeno que ya es una realidad a nivel global y que ha llegado para quedarse. Y afortunadamente nuestras autoridades de competencia así lo han entendido".

Agradezco al CentroCompetencia de la Universidad Adolfo Ibañez y a su director, Felipe Irarrázabal, por la invitación a comentar el excelente artículo de Andrés Fuchs y Nader Mufdi sobre los desafíos que suponen los mercados digitales para el derecho de la competencia en Latinoamérica. El trabajo de Fuchs y Mufdi es sin duda un inmenso aporte a una interrogante cada día más contingente: ¿Cuál debiese ser la respuesta del derecho de la competencia frente al surgimiento y consolidación de los mercados digitales?

Al margen de las propuestas que han surgido a propósito de esta problemática en el mundo desarrollado (principalmente en Estados Unidos y Europa) los autores sugieren una serie de medidas para que la autoridad de competencia en Latinoamérica pueda enfrentar de mejor forma el proceso de transición a la economía digital. Ahí -a mi juicio- está no solo lo novedoso del trabajo de Fuchs y Mufdi, sino también su gran contribución.

En concreto, los autores consideran que la solución en Latinoamérica frente al desafío que plantean los mercados digitales no se encuentra necesariamente en alguna de las opciones que se han adoptado en el extranjero. En el caso latinoamericano la solución no necesariemente consistirá en una redefinición de todo el paradigma o la aproximación tradicional del derecho antitrust como disciplina y sus objetivos (como sería el caso de Estados Unidos), así como tampoco la introducción de diversas reformas legislativas (como se ha pretendido en Europa). Según Fuchs y Mufdi, la solución más adecuada a nuestra realidad sería adoptar una alternativa híbrida, mediante el ejercicio de atribuciones de la autoridad de competencia, que permita combinar reglas sustantivas, criterios y principios del derecho de la competencia con diversos mecanismos regulatorios.

Como bien destacan los autores, para poder implementar adecuadamente estas soluciones se requiere que las autoridades de competencia tengan las herramientas y la flexibilidad suficiente para poder ir adaptándose a las realidades cambiantes y esencialmente dinámicas que caracterizan a los mercados digitales.

En ese sentido, la regulación e institucionalidad chilena aparece como una de las más preparadas para afrontar los desafíos en la región. En efecto, tenemos un Tribunal de Defensa de la Libre Competencia (“TDLC”) y ello no es menor, porque nuestro país es el único de Latinoamérica (y de los pocos del mundo) que tienen la suerte de contar con un tribunal de defensa de la competencia. El TDLC cuenta con amplias e importantes facultades preventivas, está habilitado para revisar asuntos de carácter no contencioso con la posibilidad de fijar condiciones que deban cumplirse para resguardar la competencia en los mercados.[1] Asimismo, el TDLC tiene prerrogativas propositivas tendientes a modificar normativas o derogar preceptos legales y reglamentarios que se estimen contrarios a la libre competencia.[2] Todo eso sumado a la facultad regulatoria de dictar instrucciones de carácter general a observar por los particulares en la ejecución y celebración de actos y contratos.[3]

Valga destacar que el TDLC puede ejercer estas dos últimas facultades (de proposición normativa y de dictación de instrucciones de carácter general) de oficio, lo que le otorga aún más libertad y autonomía para poder revisar posibles fallas de mercado y eventuales defectos en la regulación. De hecho, sin ir más lejos, hace solo algunos meses el TDLC decidió iniciar de oficio un proceso de dictación de instrucciones de carácter general en el mercado de los medios de pago, especialmente marcado por la presencia de soluciones digitales e innovaciones tecnológicas.[4]

Además, deben sumarse a las facultades de la Fiscalía Nacional Económica (“FNE”), especialmente reforzadas con la última modificación al Decreto Ley Nº211 del año 2016, la de realizar estudios sobre la evolución competitiva de los mercados[5] y la de formular proposiciones normativas.[6] Como sabemos, la Fiscalía ha utilizado de manera exitosa ambas facultades en los últimos años.

Mención aparte merece el también “nuevo” régimen de control de operaciones de concentración introducido también por la última modificación legal del año 2016. Dicho mecanismo le ha permitido a la FNE analizar en los últimos cinco años un sinfín de mercados de manera preventiva, con especial detención en sus condiciones particulares de competencia. Incluyendo precisamente operaciones de concentración horizontales en plataformas digitales que han sido revisadas de manera exitosa por la FNE, como fue la reciente aprobación de la adquisición de Cornershop Technologies LLC por parte de Uber Technologies, Inc.[7] Lo anterior demuestra que las herramientas para analizar ex ante concentraciones en mercados digitales que puedan suponer un riesgo para la competencia ya están y han probado ser efectivas.

En cualquier caso todavía hay desafíos que persisten. Uno de ellos es precisamente una eventual necesidad de redefinir ciertas reglas para el análisis de operaciones, particularmente en lo que se refiere a los umbrales de notificación obligatoria. Ello considerando que podrían existir compañías que operen en mercados digitales que no siempre generen el suficiente volumen de ventas para gatillar la revisión de fusiones, pero que por su relevancia justifiquen un chequeo preventivo de la autoridad.[8]

En ese sentido, se hace más necesario que nunca mantenerse pendiente de cómo se desarrollan estos temas en jurisdicciones extranjeras y cuáles son los resultados de las distintas decisiones de las autoridades a nivel internacional, evitando los riesgos del copy paste, como acertadamente destacan Fuchs y Mufdi.

Y es que -en palabras de los autores- el rezago de la región en el desarrollo de los mercados digitales ofrece una oportunidad única para implementar soluciones adecuadas aprovechando la experiencia de jurisdicciones en las que estos temas se han desarrollado intensamente. Ello, por supuesto, no implica adoptar un rol completamente pasivo, ni mucho menos actuar como simples espectadores del acontecer internacional. Por el contrario, exige ir preparándose para un fenómeno que ya es una realidad a nivel global y que ha llegado para quedarse. Y afortunadamente nuestras autoridades de competencia así lo han entendido.

De hecho, en sus recientes cuentas públicas, tanto el TDLC[9] como la FNE[10] manifestaron un interés e inquietud particular por estos temas. Tanto es así que la FNE decidió incluso modificar después de casi 10 años su Guía para el Análisis de Operaciones de Concentración Horizontales,[11] con especial foco en los mercados digitales. Y no solo eso, es del caso destacar también el hecho de que recientemente la FNE haya creado una Unidad de Inteligencia dependiente de la División de Carteles, con especialistas en ciencias económicas y en tecnologías de la información. Equipos multidisciplinarios como ese serán sumamente útiles para prevenir, detectar y perseguir atentados a la libre competencia en mercados digitales, especialmente tratándose de, por ejemplo, ilícitos cometidos por medio de algoritmos.

Finalmente, solo resta mencionar que dicho evidente interés de la autoridad debe ir acompañado de un constante monitoreo de la realidad internacional y del uso permanente de las plataformas de coordinación y cooperación mutua con otras autoridades en el extranjero, especialmente considerando que los mercados digitales tienen un impacto y trascendencia marcadamente global.

[1] Artículo 18, Nº2 del Decreto Ley Nº211.

[2] Artículo 18, Nº4 del Decreto Ley Nº211.

[3] Artículo 18, Nº3 del Decreto Ley Nº211.

[4] Véase la causa Rol NC Nº474-2020, caratulado Procedimiento para la dictación de Instrucción General sobre las condiciones de competencia en el mercado de los medios de pago con tarjetas de crédito, tarjetas de débito y tarjetas de pagom con provisión de fondos.

[5] Artículo 39, letra p) del Decreto Ley Nº211.

[6] Artículo 39, letra q) del Decreto Ley Nº211.

[7] Investigación Rol FNE F217-2019.

[8] Sobre la experiencia comparada en este tema, véase la nota publicada por el CentroCompetencia de la Universidad Adolfo Ibañez sobre la modificación de los criterios para determinar cuándo una operación de concentración debe ser notificada en Japón, Alemania y Austria. Disponible en:

https://centrocompetencia.com/ahora-japon-umbrales-de-notificacion-distintos-a-ventas-para-mercados-digitales/

[9] Cuenta Anual Pública correspondiente al año 2021. Disponible en:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1HAz-5IABt0

[10] Cuenta Pública Participativa correspondiente al año 2020. Disponible en:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uejArRkSVdQ

[11] FNE, Guía para el Análisis de Operaciones de Concentración Horizontales, mayo de 2021. Disponible en:

https://www.fne.gob.cl/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Guia-para-el-Analisis-de-Operaciones-de-Concentracion-Horizontales-mayo-VF.pdf

Carlos A. Patron es Abogado de la P. Universidad Católica de Chile y LL.M. de la Universidad de Chicago. Árbitro del Centro de Arbitrajes y Mediación de la Cámara de Comercio de Santiago y del Centro Nacional de Arbitrajes. Socio de Pellegrini & Rencoret.

"...al menos actualmente, la autoridad de competencia colombiana parecería tener las herramientas suficientes para abordar potenciales problemas de competencia en mercados digitales, sin necesidad de contar con facultades regulatorias ex ante. Esto sugeriría evitar una ampliación de sus facultades, que podrían ser revisitadas una vez e identifique una falta de herramientas para proteger la competencia y los consumidores, ya que como bien identifican los autores, en el momento los casos sobre mercados digitales son relativamente escasos en Colombia y la región".

Agradezco la invitación que me hace Centro Competencia (CeCo), en cabeza de su Director, Felipe Irarrázabal, para escribir un comentario sobre el juicioso artículo preparado por Andrés Fuchs y Nader Mufdi, denominado “Derecho de la Competencia y Regulación de Mercados Digitales: Desafíos y Propuestas para Latinoamérica”.

 Los autores construyen su análisis y recomendaciones bajo la premisa de que las normas de competencia actuales parecerían ser suficientes (al menos en algunas jurisdicciones) para evitar eventuales abusos o daños a la competencia en mercados digitales. Después de revisar la manera en que este reto ha sido abordado en jurisdicciones como la europea y norteamericana, los autores proponen que en Latinoamérica se analice la posibilidad (dependiendo del caso) de combinar facultades regulatorias ex ante que tengan por objeto empresas con cierta preponderancia en el mercado, con la ejecución sustantiva ex post de normas antitrust, todas en cabeza de la autoridad de competencia.

La insuficiencia que parecerían tener las normas de competencia actuales para lidiar con mercados digitales, según el artículo, provendría de varias causas, entre las que se encuentran: (i) la demora de las autoridades para resolver casos sobre posibles conductas anticompetitivas en mercados digitales y para tomar medidas oportunas; (ii) la limitación de las reacciones ex post para abordar fallas propias de los mercados digitales; y (iii) la dificultad de implementar remedios idóneos para resolver estas fallas con herramientas ex post.

Un problema que parecería subyacer a las dificultades que enfrentan las autoridades en mercados digitales identificadas es la necesidad que tienen de probar, en casos concretos, la dominancia del agente como presupuesto para encontrar un ilícito antitrust y tomar medidas para reprimir su conducta. Tal situación dejaría indemnes daños a la competencia que, en opinión de algunos, se producen con la conducta de empresas que si bien no son dominantes, sí tienen una posición “preponderante” en el mercado.

Frente a este panorama, es pertinente revisar si las causas que dan origen a la recomendación de otorgar facultades ex ante a las autoridades de competencia para controlar la conducta de agentes en mercados digitales estarían presentes en el caso colombiano, al menos en principio.

La autoridad de competencia colombiana, la Superintendencia de Industria y Comercio (SIC), es una autoridad administrativa con amplias facultades legales para proteger y promover la competencia, incluyendo en los mercados digitales. Ello, en principio (y sin perjuicio de revisitar esta consideración si se identifiquen fallas concretas en nuestra jurisdicción), haría innecesario establecer un régimen ex ante para evitar o reprimir prácticas presuntamente dañinas, como proponen los autores.

En primer lugar, las normas antitrust colombianas no solo reprimen conductas unilaterales realizadas por agentes dominantes, sino también por agentes que no tienen esa posición pero que con sus conductas concretas pueden afectar la libre competencia. Así, por ejemplo, la ley colombiana sanciona la conducta de “negarse a vender o prestar servicios a una empresa o discriminar en contra de la misma cuando ello pueda entenderse como una retaliación a su política de precios”, y la conducta de “influenciar a una empresa para que incremente los precios de sus productos o para que desista de su intención de rebajarlos”, sin importar si el agente es dominante o no (artículo 48 Decreto 2153 de 1992). Si el agente tiene algún grado de preponderancia (pero no dominancia), la conducta puede ser sancionada.

Más importante aún, la ley colombiana contempla una “prohibición general” de conductas anticompetitivas, según la cual están prohibidas toda clase de prácticas, procedimientos o sistemas tendientes a limitar la libre competencia o a mantener o determinar precios inequitativos (artículo 1 de la Ley 155 de 1959). Bajo esta prohibición pueden ser reprimidas y sancionadas conductas anticompetitivas unilaterales que afecten los mercados, incluyendo los digitales, incluso sin necesidad de probar que el agente es dominante. La SIC ha hecho uso de esta prohibición en no pocas ocasiones para atacar conductas unilaterales que para la autoridad son anticompetitivas y que no fueron contempladas en una lista cerrada de abusos de la posición de dominio, lo cual le otorga flexibilidad a la autoridad.[1]

En este orden de ideas, desde el punto de vista sustantivo (y aunque la intervención es ex post), la SIC cuenta con suficiente flexibilidad y herramientas sustantivas para perseguir nuevas formas de conductas unilaterales que considere anticompetitivas, sin necesidad de modificar su régimen sustantivo.

Por otra parte, al iniciar una investigación, si existe apariencia de la ocurrencia de una práctica anticompetitiva y peligro para la competencia en la demora de la investigación, la SIC puede “ordenar, como medida cautelar, la suspensión inmediata de las conductas que puedan resultar contrarias a las disposiciones sobre protección de la competencia y competencia desleal.” (numeral 7, artículo 3, Decreto 4886). Así, cuando existan fundados temores de que una práctica unilateral, sea de un agente dominante o no, está afectando el mercado, la SIC, sin necesidad de haber adelantado la investigación, puede ordenar la cesación o modificación prematura de la conducta, en una decisión a la cual no le procede ningún recurso. Ello permite morigerar el problema de la demora en las investigaciones en otras jurisdicciones que justificaría otorgar facultades para actuar ex ante sin que se requiera de una investigación.

Debe tenerse en cuenta, adicionalmente, que el ejercicio de facultades ex ante tampoco garantizaría (según la experiencia en otros sectores de la economía colombiana) que la autoridad actuaría de forma inmediata y sin un proceso que genere debate. La sola definición, por ejemplo, de si un agente tiene determinada participación en el mercado para la posterior imposición de medidas ex ante desataría debates que tomarían tiempo en resolverse, al igual que los casos.

Adicionalmente, al momento de concluir una investigación, la SIC tiene facultades no solo para para imponer sanciones o multas pecuniarias, sino también para ordenar a los infractores la modificación o terminación de la conducta, lo que le otorga algún grado de flexibilidad (que debe ser ejercida con prudencia) al momento de fallar para emitir instrucciones frente a la conducta que deben adoptar los infractores. Incluso, al inicio de la investigación la SIC puede negociar con el investigado una terminación anticipada de la investigación, si el investigado asume compromisos de hacer o no hacer para promover la competencia y modificar su conducta. Con ello, la Autoridad podría establecer órdenes de conducta ajustadas a la medida del posible problema para la competencia, si es que logra una negociación con el investigado.

En conclusión, al menos actualmente, la autoridad de competencia colombiana parecería tener las herramientas suficientes para abordar potenciales problemas de competencia en mercados digitales, sin necesidad de contar con facultades regulatorias ex ante. Esto sugeriría evitar una ampliación de sus facultades, que podrían ser revisitadas una vez e identifique una falta de herramientas para proteger la competencia y los consumidores, ya que como bien identifican los autores, en el momento los casos sobre mercados digitales son relativamente escasos en Colombia y la región.

Para finalizar, cualquier modificación de política pública debería tener en cuenta que, en ocasiones, compañías que participan en mercados digitales también compiten con compañías que no lo hacen, por lo que en algunos casos concretos no deberían contemplarse medidas regulatorias destinadas solo para los actores que se encuentran en el segmento online. Así, por ejemplo, en materia de retail, algunas plataformas digitales compiten no solo con otras plataformas, sino también con tiendas físicas que ejercen presión competitiva. Estos factores podrían ser tenidos en cuenta al momento de debatir las ideas que de forma profunda, documentada, clara y práctica plantea el artículo comentado.

Felicito a Andrés Fuchs y Nader Mufdi por el artículo que hoy nos presentan y a CeCo por promover estos debates sobre política de competencia en Latinoamérica.

[1] Esta prohibición general ha sido objeto de no pocas críticas por su amplitud, lo que en opinión de varios violaría el debido proceso y el principio de tipicidad que debe existir en el derecho administrativo sancionador. Sin embargo, la cláusula ha superado el examen de distintas cortes, incluyendo la Corte Constitucional de Colombia.

Felipe Serrano es Abogado y especialista en Derecho Comercial de la Universidad Javeriana. Master en Leyes y Derecho de la Competencia de la Universidad de Nueva York (NYU) y Master en Políticas Públicas de la Universidad de Oxford.